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Building your own configuration for XIM360 02/24/09  (Read 18775 times)

Offline nickstudy

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*work in progress*

Still a work in progress, but added some more features and trimmed the fat. I gave it a read over once and made some minor changes. I want to re write it entirely, but that takes time which I don't have at the moment but I will....eventually.
« Last Edit: 12:03 PM - 02/24/09 by nickstudy »
Happy Xim360 tester (former)

Gamertag ii TR00F ii
That's 2 i's a space a TR then 2 zero's an F then a space then 2 more i's.

Offline nickstudy

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Version 1.5

*WARNING* This is a long read, this is also a work in progress. It's a brain dump, so if it seems scattered that is not intentional.

the QUICK START GUIDE. Read this if you want to jump in:

Quick Start Guide (Assuming you have soldered everything) for those who are so impatient and you cannot wait at all. Here is the checklist to just jump in and play.

-Install the software
-Make sure your keyboard and mouse you want to use are plugged into the pc
-Run Ximcalibrate (both xim360 and xbox 360 controller plugged into your pc that is used for Xim360 software)
-Unplug Xbox 360 controller from PC
-Turn on Xbox 360
-PLug xbox 360 controller into Xbox 360 and make sure the quadrant 1 lights up
-Insert Game (Ie COD4 or Halo 3)
-Start a match, play single player etc
-Find a config such as my config located in the Xim 360 config section
-Start Xim360 software
-Hold CTRL then hit enter to get into the config screen
-Enter in all the information from the config you found such as my config for Cod4 or Halo 3
-Assign your keys you want to use
-Hit save

PLay.


===This section covers many of the ins and outs of making your own config. Don't be in a rush to do this, it takes time and patience.Sounds like you? Read on!
UPDATED 02/24/09

Ok, so you reached the point where you got the wires soldered onto the pads, you soldered the TP's and you got the controller back together. - You most likely have a Ximflex prebuilt now :)


Now you want to learn how to get the most of it and what does it all mean and you are also asking "Where do I start?" Well, if this sounds like you then read on.

#1 thing is you should have the software to begin with, grab it here: http://xim360.com/?page_id=8   

Now, you have the software, run it and install it wherever you want and remember where you put it, you may want to create a shortcut to your directory. 

You want to make sure your controller is calibrated.

To do this, plug in the the Xbox 360 controller AND the Xim 360 into a computer that will be used to run the Xim 360 software. This will be located in the directory wherever you installed/extracted the Xim 360 files.

Look for XIMCALIBRATE. ok everything plugged in?

 Good, now run XIMCALIBRATE. A second or three may go by and a pop up box will display the settings with some numbers you don't need to bother yourself with unless you are me, which I wrote them down so if I calibrate again I can see if they changed. Ooh pretty!


Now that you got your Xim360/Xbox360 controller. it's off to the next step:

Unplug the Xbox360 controller from the computer and plug it in to the xbox 360. Make sure you leave the Xim 360 plugged in, or else....

Put a game in. I used Cod4 for the basis of my explanations, but you can use whatever you want.

Go into COOD4, go to multiplayer, then change your settings for length of match and max it out so you have plenty of time to play around.

Start the match, now select your weapons.

Let's start off by setting the DEADZONE size and shape

Start the Ximdeadzoner program and find your deadzone *updated 09/17/08*

Tonester wrote up an article on this, and I believe it's the meat and potatoes of the manipulation. This program is really easy to use once you understand the basics of it. Use the deadzone settings as a general reference as the deadzone sise given gives you the shape and the size. The deadzone size is the shape of the deadzone used by a controller and when the sticks are moved outside this zone is when the movement takes place. IE if you get a 6500 deadzone from the readings, then you would want to use something slightly larger than that or as close to it as possible without overlapping. There is more to it of course, but I'll start with that.

For your reading pleasure from Tonester

I finally figured it out :)

1) Start XIM (use whatever game config you want for now - we are just doing this for the menu manipulation)

2) Start up whatever game you want to test.  This works best in an area of the game where you won't run out of time, be shot at - its also important to make sure you aren't in some tutorial part of the game where some or all of your controls are limited.

3) Once you are in game and comfortable with your peaceful environment, close down the XIM program.

4) Start up the Deadzone Finder program now.

5) Left click and hold on the center circle and move it along the X Axis very slowly while watching your ingame screen.  As soon as you see the crosshair start to move in game, let go of the left mouse button.  This "marks" the first point on the deadzone.

6) Right click the mark you just made and this will create a new mark - once again at the center of the deadzone.

7) Left click this mark and move it along the Y axis until you barely see the crosshair ingame move once more.  Release the left mouse button as soon as this happens.

8) From here, you basically have points of reference for the X and Y axis.  Now, you need to create new marks (by right clicking).  Then, left click the new marks and drag them at all sorts of angles between the x and y axis.  After enough marks, you should get an idea as to whether or not the deadzone ingame is square or circular (by connecting the dots so to speak).

9) If you hover your mouse over a dot and before making a new one, you can use the arrow keys to "nudge" it by 1 for finer control.

10) Once you have your dots, your x and y axis, you can look at the number(s) in the top left corner.  These should represent your deadzone for that game.

Now depending on results you have determined that:

The deadzone is square - this deadzone has more of a box type feel to it. Basically when you try to look in a circle you will feel the "corners"
The deadzone is circle - this deadzone is the most desirable (for me at least), when you look in a circle you don't feel the corners and is smoother.

In a game like COD4 the deadzone is circular, so this would be you want to use. Now don't get me wrong, there are some people who like to put circles on top of squares which is what some did on Halo 3 & Xim 1. Besides "odd" behavior, putting the wrong deadzone type can have wierd results. However, certain games that are tough to tune you may find yourself playing around with the settings, that's perfectly fine and it's encouraged. Just know the rules before you break them is what I am driving at.

Ok so now you have a couple of items, your deadzone size and your deadzone type. What to do with this information?

For starters, Locate the Xim360 program and start that up.

Now hold the CTRL key and while doing that hit ENTER.

This will bring up a configuration screen.

Take the number you found from Ximdeadzoner, plug that into the DEADZONE SIZE field on screen.
Now change the deadzone type to what was determined from Ximdeadzoner, in this case I used Circular (as COD 4 is circular).

You will notice there are other settings, too:

They are (in no particular order)


Deadzone Size (as shown above)
Deadzone Type (as shown above)
XY ratio
Primary Sensitivity
Secondary Sensitivity
Translation Exponent
Diagonal Dampen
Smooth
Refresh Rate



ASSIGNING KEYS:

This is pretty easy, you click on the button (on the field by the button) and then hit the key you want to use. There is more on this such as assigning multiple buttons to one key (more coming soon)


Here is some explanations of how these settings work.


XY ratio, this controls the

X axis - this allows left and right movement

Y axis - this controls the up and down movement

The ratio is how you want your look to "feel". Heres what I mean by that, If you use a XY ratio of 2.0 that would be even on for both X and Y and the "feel" would be the same for either.

If you use a 1.0 for the XY that means that the X (left and right) will have more priority and will be faster than the Y (up and down) meaning that if you looked one inch left and one inch right, then looked one inch up and one inch down it would take alot more mouse movement to move up and down.

If you put a negative number such as -2.0 you will notice that the X feels the same yet the Y (the up and down) is backwards!! UP is DOWN and DOWN is up. Can you say "trippy". This may be handy for flight sims, but those kind of games usually have a inverse in the game itself and it could be handy to further tune if you are using a flight stick or other analog device.

Experiment with different XY ratios. For example try .50. Look up. Now look down. Notice something different? Of course, the Y is wayyyyyy slower than the X. This can be handy on games that have touchy Y axis (such as UT3). Experiment and come up with your own magic setting, again that's the beauty of the Xim 360.

Primary sensitivity:
Typically on average this is a 4 digit number, but really could be whatever you want. Starting off with 5000 seems to be a good basis. It's not as simple as just plugging in a number, Primary Sensitivity and Translation exponent along with deadzone sizes play crucial parts and really affect each other. This gets explained in the translation exponent section.

So now that you read the above and you may feel confused, don't be. The purpose of this guide is to get you up and running, but also to let you in on some of the inner workings on Xim 360 and developing your own best practices when configuring the Xim 360.

Starting off with a 5000 sensitivity, type that number in the Primary Sensitivity Field.

Secondary Sensitivity:
This is used in conjuction with a hot key that you assign to engage the "secondary" sensitivity. For example, you are playing COD 4 and you go from a hip shot to iron sights (looking down the barrell of the weapon). COd 4 has different sensitivities for hip sights and iron sights. Why? Who knows, this is something the developers thought was a great idea but really just makes most people mad. In a nutshell, the secondary sesnsitivity allows you to use a different sensitivity setting to compensate for the slower look movement while looking down iron sights. It goes something like this:

Assign the right mouse button as the secondary sensitivity toggle
Assign the primary sensitivity 5000
Assign the secondary sensitivity as 8000

You test in game, look left to right from the hip. Then hold the right mouse button and look left to right, should be about the same speed now. You can really set this to be slower, or faster it's really up to you.

I'll cover this in the "how to assign keys" section shortly.



TRANSLATION EXPONENT. Perhaps the mothership of settings and a CRITICAL part of setting correctly. Basically, getting this setting right can make or break a config. Even with a slightly larger deadzone that's got some jump to it, if your translation is screwy your game will be too.

What does it do? It combats the evil power known as "look acceleration" that developers put in games that assists gamers using thumbsticks to be able to aim easier by slowly accelerating and speeding up. This makes tracking easier if you are using a controller.

But guess what? YOU ARE USING A XIM 360 and you don't want none of that!

Translation exponent is a sort of offset that fights the acceleration and smooths out your mouse movements so you don't feel the acceleration as much or if at all. Much debate on this hot hot hot item and you too, will realize the importance of it.


Not sure what to put in? I seem to have a magic number of about .35 here. You can start out with this and then tweak it later after you assign your keys and get all your settings plugged in to test.

- NEW 02-24-09 The closer you get to 1.0 the closer you get to a 1:1 movement. You can try .35 as a starting point and boost it up. Lately I have tried going from .75 (what ships default with Xim360) and going down from there. Gears of War 2 seems to respond better to a .75 translation rather than a .35, but other games are reverse in my opinion of course.


Diagonal Dampen:

Some games like COD4 have some slight acceleration when looking diagonally. Obsiv and I swear it's there, although others may not think so (we are not crazy I promise). Basically, the diagonal dampen lessens the acceleration that is experienced while looking diagonal. Careful though use too much and you will find your movement VERY restricted. It seems best to use about a .10 to .30 or so on COD4 but lateley I have started using .10 or even .05. Again experiment here to find out your special setting.


Smooth:

This smooths out the feel a bit, but also makes the feel more weighted and sluggish. Games like COD4 really don't need it, but some find it helpful for Ut3 and Halo 3. On Halo 3 I use around .20 to .30, sometimes none at all. Experiment and find out for yourself, it's a personal preference.


Refresh Rate:

This is a polling rate, much like a USB polling rate. It refreshes so many times a second. The higher the number the better, however in my experience you won't be breaking 60.

My guidelines are

400 DPI mouse, about 40ish
800 DPI mouse about  45 to 50
1200 and 1600 dpi - 55 or so
2000+ DPI 60


How do you know what refresh rate to use? First I recommend you have all your settings correct first, then test this out. Basically look side to side very quickly and look for stutter. If the screen stops and starts again, chances are your refresh is too high. Reduce it by 5 and test again, if it keeps doing it start trying different DPI's along with different speeds. Remember: Lower DPI's use lower refresh rates, higher DPI's use higher refresh rates.

Some general testing tips and procedures.

To test your deadzone's feel do this, I recommend following this order but that's up to you:

Move your mouse the tiniest amount, I like to blow on my mouse. I am talking millimeters at most. Does the screen move? If it does that means your deadzone is pretty "tight" and that's a great thing.

If you move your mouse a bit and it doesn't move on screen, that means that the deadzone is too large and needs to be reduced.

Now look up and down, then left and right? Does it seem true to movemen, can you go straight across then straight up and down? If so, then your most likely all set.

If you experience zig zag while looking up and down or left and right, then you may have a smaller than needed deadzone. Start adding 25 to 50 onto the deadzone. Also, reduce the refresh rate by 5 or just take it down to around 40. Test it again, if it stops then you can start fine tuning by taking away a single point or 2 until it starts acting up again. Add a couple points to it and if it feels right, call it the day.

Now, look in a circle - does it feel good or does it seem to stop and go? This could be either A)Refresh rate is set too high B) Diagonal Dampen is set too high, try using 0 and then adding to it.

I hope this helps, It really is dump from my head and I hope it makes sense. I can refine it as time goes on but this is a first draft and I have not really gone through it a 3rd time to smooth out the rough spots. Let me know how it works out for you!

Iv'e added a ton of information here and I have more coming all the time so stay tuned!


02/24/09

Saitek CCU set up. This is really easy to do, just use the up or down arrown on the Xim360 software to select "Joystick and mouse" and then click on the buttons on screen and then press a button you want to assign. The joystick will work and will be full analog. Sometimes you may find you will click on a button then hit a button on the CCU and it will say like Button 22 when in reality it is button 7 (as the CCU has them marked on the unit) just save and close and reopen again and try again. Also, you can hold the button down on the CCU you want to assign and click the button which will sometimes take a second then assign the correct number. Wierd how it does that, but that's how it is for me.




*RELEASE NOTES*
Version 1.0  Drafted 09/05/08
09/16/08 Version 1.1 2nd draft released added "Tonester" section on Ximdeadzoner
09/17/08 version 1.2 3rd draft. Cleaned up certain sections and improved the flow. Added quick start guide as well.
09/17/08 Version 1.3 Added more information again and reduced the size of some sections with overlapping information
09/17/08 Version 1.4 Added a line about "Deadzone Size" and "Deadzone Shape" to list of features. Removed some words and did a little clean up (not alot, just a tiny bit) Now it's time to play some COD4 booyah!
02/24/09 Revised translation exponent baselines with extra notes.


« Last Edit: 12:02 PM - 02/24/09 by nickstudy »
Happy Xim360 tester (former)

Gamertag ii TR00F ii
That's 2 i's a space a TR then 2 zero's an F then a space then 2 more i's.

Offline AngrySoul

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Re: Building your own configuration for XIM360
« Reply #2 on: 01:58 PM - 09/18/08 »
wow.. this looks great.. 8)

Offline nickstudy

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Re: Building your own configuration for XIM360
« Reply #3 on: 02:35 PM - 09/18/08 »
Thanks! Still working on, cleaning it up and will ad chapters/sections for quick finding. Over time it will be tuned and retuned. I'll be releasing a new version this sunday which should be cleaner, leaner and meaner and easier to read. Stay tuned!
Happy Xim360 tester (former)

Gamertag ii TR00F ii
That's 2 i's a space a TR then 2 zero's an F then a space then 2 more i's.

Offline mitch84208

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Re: Building your own configuration for XIM360
« Reply #4 on: 10:51 PM - 09/18/08 »
this is GREAT!!! a big help for me, if only it was here a week sooner!

Offline nickstudy

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Re: Building your own configuration for XIM360
« Reply #5 on: 12:01 AM - 09/19/08 »
I got some more to add, will be posting tommorow at work.
Happy Xim360 tester (former)

Gamertag ii TR00F ii
That's 2 i's a space a TR then 2 zero's an F then a space then 2 more i's.

Offline Techrival

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Re: Building your own configuration for XIM360
« Reply #6 on: 11:52 AM - 09/20/08 »
Nick seriously.. dude.. great work. This is exactly what I was looking for. Now I know precisely what I need to tweak to get even better performance out of my cfg.. all thanks to you. Halo 3 is my main game and my config feels pretty @#$% good at the moment but I had a slight bit of concern with the sensitivity on the Y axis.. its not sensitive enough and I didnt know how XY ratio affected that. Didn't really want to easter egg around either but at least now I have a bit of direction to follow. Just to clarify.. if I choose a XY ratio from 1.0 to 2.0 i.e. 1.5 ..the sensitivity on the Y axis will increase, right? Thats how I understood your explanation. Would it be too difficult for obsiv to split that into 2 blocks? Like.. instead of XY ratio.. maybe Xsens and Ysens? Just a thought. So thanks again.. much appreciated.
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Offline Hyperion

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Re: Building your own configuration for XIM360
« Reply #7 on: 02:23 PM - 09/20/08 »
Great work Nick... thanks for all the info :)

paulybear

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Re: Building your own configuration for XIM360
« Reply #8 on: 04:33 PM - 10/11/08 »
Can't wait to absorb all this great info and apply it to my cgfs when i get an xim360.

Thanks for posting Nick!

Offline gerfle

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Re: Building your own configuration for XIM360
« Reply #9 on: 11:34 AM - 10/12/08 »
Question: How do we PS3 owners set up if we can't plug in the PS3 controller?

Offline CEOrko

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Re: Building your own configuration for XIM360
« Reply #10 on: 01:22 PM - 10/12/08 »
Question: How do we PS3 owners set up if we can't plug in the PS3 controller?

If you mean for calibration, that is something specific to the XIM2, which is designed for the Xbox 360. PS3 owners don't have to worry about calibration with their XIM.

Offline gerfle

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Re: Building your own configuration for XIM360
« Reply #11 on: 11:15 AM - 10/13/08 »
ok great.. thank you.

Offline Axelay

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Re: Building your own configuration for XIM360
« Reply #12 on: 12:04 PM - 02/11/09 »
Just wanted to say THANK YOU for this topic. I just got my XIM 360 yesterday, and I have a lot to learn. This should help me in a big way.

Offline zenstrata

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Re: Building your own configuration for XIM360
« Reply #13 on: 02:12 PM - 02/21/09 »
Very useful information.  I only have one problem .. I run everything through one monitor.  I.e. my 360 and my computer both run through the same monitor.  This means I can't use the deadzone program without having a second screen >.<

Offline nickstudy

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Re: Building your own configuration for XIM360
« Reply #14 on: 04:18 PM - 02/21/09 »
Very useful information.  I only have one problem .. I run everything through one monitor.  I.e. my 360 and my computer both run through the same monitor.  This means I can't use the deadzone program without having a second screen >.<


That is common, you either need PIP (picture in picture) or you need to run it from another laptop, or get a second monitor. Ximdeadzoner is essential to getting good results and is a stepping stone to getting a tight config. You could use someone's config that is pre made and just mess with it. Basically, if you can BARELY move the mouse at all and it moves that's @#$% good. I like to blow on my mouse and if it barely moves where I don't SEE the mouse move but I get movement on screen then I know it's good.

Of course once you get to that point, you have to watch out for zig zagging, which you can increase/decrease size of deadzone in order to dampen or eliminate that effect. 8)
Happy Xim360 tester (former)

Gamertag ii TR00F ii
That's 2 i's a space a TR then 2 zero's an F then a space then 2 more i's.