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A brief mathematical description of steady aim?  (Read 832 times)

Offline EvilSparx

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A brief mathematical description of steady aim?
« on: 12:00 AM - 06/02/17 »
I would like to know what steady aim actually does and how it works, I'm not sure what language the devs use to program XIM but would it be possible to get a brief description?

I assume it takes the input of the mouse and performs some sort of timed average in order to retain some sort of momentum.

I'd just like to figure out for myself in what situations or games it would be beneficial ie. games with higher max turn speeds, heavy aim assist or even how different polling rates and dpi affect it.

Offline OBsIV

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Re: A brief mathematical description of steady aim?
« Reply #1 on: 09:36 AM - 06/02/17 »
There isn't any temporal filtering -- rather it's quantizing results in different ways (depending on the SA version). I think trying to make correlations between this and how it will be beneficial in games would be very hard since feedback isn't consistent between people using these builds.
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Offline EvilSparx

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Re: A brief mathematical description of steady aim?
« Reply #2 on: 10:47 AM - 06/02/17 »
When I say time I mean do you store a list of mouse values and then say, average the last 10 positions and use that to alter the joystick position. If that's the case then having a higher dpi or higher polling rate would make it less effective since the stored mouse values would be closer together. * unless you already take into account the dpi and polling rate.

You could also try taking the last 100 or so  mouse values but in multiples of 10 and average those to alter the joystick position, essentially increasing the 'smoothness'.

That's how I assume it works but I don't know if it's more or less complicated than that.

Edit* this method would also work for joystick position, but you mentioning quantised makes me think that the XIM works not by translating a mouse movement to a joystick motion, but rather just emulating little packets of joystick positions and returning to the centre position when the mouse is not moving. If that's the case, couldn't you potentially send the opposite position to the console when the mouse stops, as this would, at best help negate any aim smoothing already integrated into the game or at worst, make the deceleration a lot tighter.
« Last Edit: 11:17 AM - 06/02/17 by EvilSparx »